Hamlet Mountaineering

HAmlet Blog

Blog

Suilven by Canoe

Suilven is a classic and unmistakeable outline on the northwest highlands skyline. The remote and isolated Graham sits at 731 meters high and usually requires a 3 hour walk in to access it’s steep and intimidating sides. Enter the Canoe, drifting silently across Loch Veyatie. Camping on Fionn Loch is most certainly my favourite way to access Suilven.

Putting the boats in underneath the very picturesque hamlet of Elphin gives you the sense of leaving all civilisation behind. Quietly paddling between the majestic Cul Mor and Suilven gives you a feeling that you are traveling through a truly ancient landscape. With snow showers and sunshine taking turns to dominate the sky making the views all the more spectacular.

Setting up the tent on a perfectly flat and most ideal position we could not help but be impressed and intimidated by the dominating outline of Suilven which was to be our objective for the following day.

Waking up in the morning the mist began to clear as we approached the ridge and lifted completely for our traverse of the summit ridge revealing a winter wonderland spread across a cnoc and Lochan landscape. Formed by billions of years of erosion and then affected by the world renowned Moine thrust and finally sculpted by a period of glaciation this landscape is one of the oldest in Europe and as you stand up there it is almost palpable.

Saddened to leave when the weather was so beautiful we started to make our descent back to the canoes and retreat back up Loch Veyatie. Feeling awe inspired and pleased to be able to travel in such a jaw dropping landscape.

More information about the geology can be found on the North West Highlands Geopark website

Suilven by Canoe
Paddling along Loch Veyatie
Suilven by Canoe
Calm conditions with Cul Mor in the background
Suilven By Canoe
Reflections on Loch Veyatie
Suilven by Canoe
Home from home
Suilven By Canoe
Paddling into Suilven
Suilven
The summit ridge
Suilven
looking to the East Summit
suilven
Roger enjoying the sun
Stac Pollaidh, Cul mor and Ben Mor Coigach
Stac Pollaidh, Cul mor and Ben Mor Coigach
Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookEmail this to someone

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

MENU